Workers’ Comp Lawyer: Asking the Right Questions

Work injuries and workers’ comp claims can bring a world of stress and questions. Depending on how your case goes, you might benefit from the assistance of a legal professional.

Many people think it’s best to hire an attorney when the going gets rough, but we’re here to tell you that’s not the case. The best time to seek help from an attorney is before you speak to your employer’s HR rep.

Attorneys can give you advice and insight on what to do next in your situation, and on the bright side, they’re the ones who want the best for you. So when you start to look for an attorney to represent you, it’s important you ask the right stuff to find the right fit.

Here are the right questions to ask your worker’s comp attorney to get the most out of your settlement.

1. How Many Cases Have You Worked On And What Is Your Success Rate?

Worker’s comp claims are not the same as other court cases. There are a lot of loopholes to look through since workplaces have procedures in place to try and avoid paying settlements. Because of this, it’s important to hire an attorney with proven experience of working on worker’s comp cases and bringing success to their clients.

When you meet with each attorney, be sure to ask how many worker’s comp cases they’ve handled and what the outcomes were to judge if they are the right fit.

2. Do You Have Court Experience?

Most workers’ comp claims do not make it to court, but that doesn’t mean it can’t happen. If, by chance, your case goes to court, it’s important to hire an attorney you feel confident in who has the right court experience to represent you at that time.

3. How Much Do You Charge?

It’s no secret that a lawyer can be a significant investment, but it’s worth it to prevail against workplace injuries and make you receive the help and benefits you need. Lawyers are typically paid in two ways: by the hour or with a contingency fee.

Most lawyers choose the contingency fee, which means you will pay them anywhere between 33-40% of your settlement earnings. If your lawyer agrees to a contingency fee, it’s important you have a legal document signed stating the agreed-upon form of payment, so no issues arise later on.

4. How Long Do I Have To File My Claim?

In most cases, workers have up to a year from the day of their injury to file a worker’s comp claim. However, this can be difficult to determine if you have suffered from a gradual internal injury. Each state has a different timeline, but Louisiana operates within one to three years.

While there is a little cushion room, it’s still important to file a claim as soon as you can or seek legal advice on how to file your worker’s comp claim. There is a lot of tedious paperwork involved with filing a worker’s comp claim, so you speak to your HR rep as soon as possible to give the paperwork to your attorney for them to look over.

5. How Much Should I Get In Settlement?

It’s imperative that your main concern throughout this process will be compensated with how much you get paid and when you get paid. Depending on how complicated your case is will determine how long the case is dragged out before you see any money. How much you will receive depends on several factors too.

Your attorney will be able to give you more advice and inform you of what you’re likely to see as you work throughout the case, and provide them with more details. The factors that will determine your settlement include complexity or f you’re approved or denied.

If You Have More Questions Just Ask Us

Instead of feeling overwhelmed about what to do, start speaking to a legal representative today. The experts at Louisiana Accident Lawyers are here to help you with your claim and in the process of this difficult time.

Our firm has helped Louisiana residents recover millions in returns, and we want to do the same for you. Getting started is easy. We will set you up with a free case review to go over your position and see what we can do in your journey.

To set up your free consultation, call us anytime at (225) 224-7335.

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